Atmospheric science

FILE- In this Dec. 1, 2009, file photo, Rajendra Kumar Pachauri attends a press conference in New Delhi, India. The Indian environmentalist, under whose chairmanship the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change won the Nobel Peace Prize alongside former U.S. Vice President Al Gore in 2007, has died after a heart surgery. Pachauri’s death was announced late Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020, by The Energy and Resources Institute, or TERI, a research group he headed until 2016 in New Delhi. He was 79. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan, file)
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February 13, 2020 - 10:06 pm
NEW DELHI (AP) — Indian environmentalist Rajendra Kumar Pachauri, under whose leadership a U.N. climate change panel shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, has died after recent heart surgery. He was 79. Pachauri’s death was announced late Thursday by The Energy and Resources Institute, or TERI, a...
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Police officers stand near activists outside BP's headquarters to mark the first day of the oil company's new chief executive Bernard Looney, at St James' Square in London, Wednesday Feb. 5, 2020. Around 100 environmental activists mounted the peaceful protest in central London as Bernard Looney prepared to take up his new role. (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)
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February 12, 2020 - 11:06 am
LONDON (AP) — Energy producer BP said Wednesday it wants to eliminate or offset all carbon emissions from its operations and the oil and gas it sells to customers by 2050, though it remains unclear how it would achieve such an ambitious target as the company comes under pressure to help combat...
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In this Jan. 11, 2020 photo a man photographs waves crashing onto the cliffs at Rodea Point in Lincoln County, Ore. during an extreme high tide that coincided with a big winter storm. Amateur scientists are whipping out their smartphones to document the effects of extreme high tides on shore lines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels due to climate change will mean for coastal communities around the world. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
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February 05, 2020 - 1:01 pm
DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — Tourists, nature lovers and amateur scientists are whipping out their cameras to document the effects of extreme high tides on shorelines from the United States to New Zealand, and by doing so are helping better predict what rising sea levels will mean for coastal communities...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
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February 05, 2020 - 12:37 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
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FILE - In this July 29, 2019, file photo, a monarch butterfly rests on a plant at Abbott's Mill Nature Center in Milford, Del. The western monarch butterfly population wintering along California's coast remained critically low for the second year in a row, a count by an environmental group released Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, showed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
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January 23, 2020 - 9:09 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The western monarch butterfly population wintering along California's coast remains critically low for the second year in a row, a count by an environmental group released Thursday showed. The count of the orange-and-black insects by the Xerces Society, a nonprofit...
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Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg takes her seat prior to the opening session of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2020. The 50th annual meeting of the forum will take place in Davos from Jan. 20 until Jan. 24, 2020. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
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January 21, 2020 - 2:19 pm
DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — Greta Thunberg isn't easily intimidated. The 17-year-old Swedish activist wasted little time on Tuesday to push back against U.S. President Donald Trump's description of climate campaigners as “the perennial prophets of doom" who predict the "apocalypse.” Though Trump didn...
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FILE - In this Nov. 1, 2019, file photo, flames from a backfire consume a hillside as firefighters battle the Maria Fire in Santa Paula, Calif. The decade that just ended was by far the hottest ever measured on Earth, capped off by the second-warmest year on record, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
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January 15, 2020 - 11:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The decade that just ended was by far the hottest ever measured on Earth, capped off by the second-warmest year on record, two U.S. agencies reported Wednesday. And scientists said they see no end to the way man-made climate change keeps shattering records. “If you think you've...
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In this Monday, Dec. 30, 2019, aerial photo, wildfires rage under plumes of smoke in Bairnsdale, Australia. Thousands of tourists fled Australia's wildfire-ravaged eastern coast Thursday ahead of worsening conditions as the military started to evacuate people trapped on the shore further south. (Glen Morey via AP)
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January 03, 2020 - 8:03 pm
Australia’s unprecedented wildfires are supercharged thanks to climate change, the type of trees catching fire and weather, experts say. And these fires are so extreme that they are triggering their own thunderstorms. Here are a few questions and answers about the science behind the Australian...
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In this March 2016 photo provided by The Island Institute, Bigelow Laboratory Research Associate Brittney Honisch measures a piece of sugar kelp before harvest in Casco Bay, Maine. A group of scientists with Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences and farmers in northern New England are working on a plan to feed seaweed to cows to gauge whether it can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. (Scott Sell/The Island Institute via AP)
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December 29, 2019 - 10:28 am
FREEPORT, Maine (AP) — Coastal Maine has a lot of seaweed , and a fair number of cows. A group of scientists and farmers think that pairing the two could help unlock a way to cope with a warming world. The researchers — from a marine science lab, an agriculture center and universities in northern...
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FILE - In this Dec. 22, 2010, file photo, Bart Siegel of New Orleans looks through binoculars for birds during the National Audubon Society's annual Christmas bird count on the Gulf Coast in Grand Isle, La. It's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. And the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. (AP Photo/Sean Gardner, File)
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December 16, 2019 - 11:02 am
Ít's been 120 years since New York ornithologist Frank Chapman launched his Christmas Bird Count as a bold new alternative to what had been a longtime Christmas tradition of hunting birds. Today, the annual count continues, stronger and more important than ever. “He realized that we were over-...
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