Astronomy

This undated artist rendering from the European Space Agency, shows the European-Russian ExoMars rover. As Mars' newest resident settles in, Planet Earth is working on three more landers and at least two orbiters to join the scientific Martian brigade. ExoMars also will sniff out possible past life, drilling a couple yards (meters) down for chemical fossils. A spacecraft that was part of an ExoMars mission in 2016 crash-landed on the red planet. NASA's InSight spacecraft touched down on Mars on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (European Space Agency via AP)
December 01, 2018 - 8:37 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — As Mars' newest resident settles in, Planet Earth is working on three more landers and at least two orbiters to join the scientific Martian brigade. NASA's InSight spacecraft touched down on the sweeping, red equatorial plains Monday, less than 400 miles (640 kilometers...
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FILE - In this Oct. 12, 2018 file photo, Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jim Bridenstine speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, Russia. America's next moon landing will be made by private companies, not NASA. Bridenstine announced Thursday, Nov. 29 that nine U.S. companies will compete in delivering experiments to the lunar surface. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, File)
November 29, 2018 - 3:11 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — America's next moon landing will be made by private companies — not NASA. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine announced Thursday that nine U.S. companies will compete in delivering experiments to the lunar surface. Bridenstine says NASA will buy the service and let...
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FILE - This image made available by NASA shows the planet Mars. This composite photo was created from over 100 images of Mars taken by Viking Orbiters in the 1970s. In our solar system family, Mars is Earth’s next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow on Monday, Nov. 26 with the arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. (NASA via AP, File)
November 26, 2018 - 5:26 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A NASA spacecraft's six-month journey to Mars neared its dramatic grand finale Monday in what scientists and engineers hoped would be a soft precision landing on flat red plains. The InSight lander aimed for an afternoon touchdown, as anxiety built among those involved...
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FILE - This image made available by NASA shows the planet Mars. This composite photo was created from over 100 images of Mars taken by Viking Orbiters in the 1970s. In our solar system family, Mars is Earth’s next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow on Monday, Nov. 26 with the arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. (NASA via AP, File)
November 25, 2018 - 9:43 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — With just a day to go, NASA's InSight spacecraft aimed for a bull's-eye touchdown on Mars, zooming in like an arrow with no turning back. InSight's journey of six months and 300 million miles (482 million kilometers) comes to a precarious grand finale Monday afternoon...
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FILE - This image made available by NASA shows the planet Mars. This composite photo was created from over 100 images of Mars taken by Viking Orbiters in the 1970s. In our solar system family, Mars is Earth’s next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow on Monday, Nov. 26 with the arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. (NASA via AP, File)
November 24, 2018 - 3:36 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — In our solar system family, Mars is Earth's next-of-kin, the next-door relative that has captivated humans for millennia. The attraction is sure to grow with Monday's arrival of a NASA lander named InSight. InSight should provide our best look yet at Mars' deep interior...
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FILE - In this file photo from June 6, 2018, Roscosmos state space corporation head Dmitry Rogozin, accompanies new International Space Station crew members, to the rocket prior to the launch at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Rogozin said in a video posted to Twitter on Saturday, Nov. 24, 2018, that a proposed Russian mission to the moon will be tasked with verifying that the American moon landings were real, though he appeared to be making a joke. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, Pool Photo via AP, File)
November 24, 2018 - 2:25 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — The head of Russia's Roscosmos space agency has said that a proposed Russian mission to the moon will be tasked with verifying that the American moon landings were real, though he appeared to be making a joke. "We have set this objective to fly and verify whether they've been there or...
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FILE - This illustration made available by NASA in March 2018 shows the twin Mars Cube One project (MarCO) spacecrafts flying over Mars with Earth and the sun in the distance. The MarCOs will be the first CubeSats, a kind of modular, mini-satellite, flown into deep space. They're designed to fly along behind NASA's InSight lander on its cruise to Mars. (NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP)
November 22, 2018 - 8:23 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A pair of tiny experimental satellites trailing NASA's InSight spacecraft all the way to Mars face their biggest test yet. Their mission is to broadcast immediate news of InSight's plunge through the Martian atmosphere on Monday. The twin CubeSats will pass within a few...
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FILE - This illustration made available by NASA in 2018 shows the InSight lander drilling into the surface of Mars. InSight, short for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, is scheduled to arrive at the planet on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. (NASA via AP)
November 20, 2018 - 2:57 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Mars is about to get its first U.S. visitor in years: a three-legged, one-armed geologist to dig deep and listen for quakes. NASA's InSight makes its grand entrance through the rose-tinted Martian skies on Monday, after a six-month, 300 million-mile (480 million-...
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University of Hawaii President David Lassner, left, speaks at a news conference on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018 in Honolulu accompanied by state Board of Land and Natural Resources Chairwoman Suzanne Case, second from left, Attorney General Russell Suzuki,second from right, and Hawaii Gov. David Ige, right, regarding a Hawaii Supreme Court ruling upholding a decision to grant a permit for the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea. The state Supreme Court's 4-1 ruling is a victory for the contentious Thirty Meter Telescope planned for Hawaii's tallest mountain. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy)
October 30, 2018 - 10:09 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — After years of delay, including lengthy court battles and passionate protests from those willing to be arrested for blocking construction crews, builders of a giant telescope plan to move forward with constructing the $1.4 billion instrument on a Hawaii mountain that is considered...
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FILE - This Aug. 31, 2015, file photo shows telescopes on the summit of Mauna Kea on Hawaii's Big Island. Hawaii's Supreme Court upheld a decision to grant a construction permit for an embattled, international giant telescope project planned for a mountain Native Hawaiians consider sacred. The court ruling Tuesday, Oct.. 30, 2018, is a victory for the contentious Thirty Meter Telescope planned for Hawaii's tallest mountain, Mauna Kea. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
October 30, 2018 - 8:54 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — The Latest on Hawaii Supreme Court's decision upholding a construction permit for a giant telescope (all times local): 1:30 p.m. Hawaii's attorney general says there are further legal actions possible in the long saga over whether a giant telescope can be built atop the state's...
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