Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 12, 2016 file photo, Rep. Jimmy Anderson, D-Fitchburg, responded to a question during an interview at the Wisconsin State Journal in Madison, Wis. Republicans who control the Wisconsin Assembly intend to change their rules to allow Anderson, a paralyzed Democratic lawmaker, to phone into committee meetings he can't attend in person. Anderson requested accommodations in January. He's threatened to sue, alleging Republicans are violating the Americans with Disabilities Act. (M.P. King/Wisconsin State Journal via AP,File)
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October 08, 2019 - 2:18 pm
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A paralyzed Wisconsin lawmaker would be allowed to call into committee meetings he can't attend in person under rule changes Republicans unveiled Tuesday that are designed to meet demands the Democrat made nearly a year ago. Republicans provided The Associated Press with their...
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FILE - This July 23, 2014 file photo shows a state prison in Florence, Ariz. In May 2019, Corizon Health Inc. and Corizon LLC that provide health care in jails and prisons across the United States, including this one in Florence, have agreed to pay $950,000 to resolve a lawsuit that alleged it discriminated against employees with disabilities by failing to accommodate them, requiring them to be fully healed before they can return to work, and firing them. (AP Photo/File)
May 17, 2019 - 2:27 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Two companies that provide health care in jails and prisons across the United States have agreed to pay $950,000 to resolve a lawsuit that alleged it discriminated against employees with disabilities by failing to accommodate them, requiring them to be fully healed before they can...
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Mary Radnofsky, diagnosed with a rare form of leukoencephalopathy and in the early stages of dementia, holds her service dog Benjy at her home, on Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Alexandria, Va. Faced with an aging American workforce, U.S. companies are increasingly navigating delicate conversations with employees suffering from cognitive declines or dementia diagnoses, experts say. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
January 28, 2019 - 3:02 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Faced with an aging American workforce, companies are increasingly navigating delicate conversations with employees grappling with cognitive declines, experts say. Workers experiencing early stages of dementia may struggle with tasks they had completed without difficulty...
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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2018, file photo, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, waves after addresses the Utah Senate while Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, R-Sandy, looks on at the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. Hatch is ending his tenure as the longest-serving Republican senator in history, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019, capping a unique career that positioned him as one of the most prominent conservative voices in the United States. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
January 03, 2019 - 10:36 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Orrin Hatch ended his tenure Thursday as the longest-serving Republican senator in history, capping a unique career that positioned him as one of the most prominent conservatives in the United States. The departure of the vocal supporter of President Donald Trump ushers in...
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File-This combination of May 20, 2018, file photos shows Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp in Atlanta. A predominantly black county in rural Georgia is facing a nationwide backlash over plans to close about 75 percent of its voting locations ahead of the November election. Officials have fired a consultant, Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, after widespread opposition erupted over a proposal to close most polling places in a predominantly black Georgia county, the county’s lawyer said Thursday. Randolph County lawyer Tommy Coleman gave The Associated Press a letter he sent Wednesday to consultant Mike Malone ending the contract. (AP Photos/John Amis, File)
August 24, 2018 - 2:38 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Election officials in a majority black county in rural south Georgia took less than a minute Friday to scrap a proposal to eliminate most of the local polling places, after the plan drew criticism from all over the country. Concern about the proposal to close seven of the county's...
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File-This combination of May 20, 2018, file photos shows Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp in Atlanta. A predominantly black county in rural Georgia is facing a nationwide backlash over plans to close about 75 percent of its voting locations ahead of the November election. Officials have fired a consultant, Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, after widespread opposition erupted over a proposal to close most polling places in a predominantly black Georgia county, the county’s lawyer said Thursday. Randolph County lawyer Tommy Coleman gave The Associated Press a letter he sent Wednesday to consultant Mike Malone ending the contract. (AP Photos/John Amis, File)
August 21, 2018 - 5:45 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — A predominantly black county in rural Georgia is facing a nationwide backlash over plans to close about 75 percent of its voting locations ahead of the November election. County officials say the locations are inaccessible to those with disabilities; critics say the closures will...
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This March 26, 2015 photo shows a maximum security cell block at the Whatcom County Jail in Bellingham, Wash. In a novel case with national implications, the Washington state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union is suing the jail to force it to provide opiate-withdrawal medication to prisoners, rather than requiring them to go cold turkey. The lawsuit, filed Thursday, June 7, 2018 in U.S. District Court in Seattle, says the Whatcom County Jail's refusal to provide the medicine violates the Americans with Disability Act, because opioid addiction qualifies as a disability under the law. (Philip A. Dwyer/The Bellingham Herald via AP)
June 07, 2018 - 7:53 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — In a novel case that could have national implications, the Washington state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union sued a county sheriff's office to force it to provide opiate-withdrawal medication to prisoners, rather than requiring them to go cold turkey. The lawsuit, filed...
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