Alcoholic beverage manufacturing

In this June 14, 2018, photo, Democratic U.S. Senate candidate and former Gov. Phil Bredesen, left, talks with David Womack, a farmer and former American Soybean Development Foundation president, during a visit to Farrar Farm in Flat Creek, Tenn. Trade and tariff concerns are roiling high-profile Senate contests across Tennessee, Missouri, Indiana, Pennsylvania and even North Dakota _ states where Republican candidates are being forced to answer for the trade policies of a Republican president they have rallied behind on virtually every other major issue. Bredesen faces Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., in the November election for the seat of retiring Republican Sen. Bob Corker. (AP Photo/Jonathan Mattise)
July 09, 2018 - 12:01 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Jimmy Tosh's sprawling hog farm in rural Tennessee is an unlikely battleground in the fight for control of the U.S. Senate. Yet his 15,000 acres (6,000 hectares) two hours west of Nashville showcase the practical risks of President Donald Trump's trade policies and the...
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A man pushes a piece of luggage past a mural depicting air travel and a prosperous city in Beijing, China, Tuesday, July 3, 2018. Barring a last-minute breakthrough, the Trump administration on Friday will start imposing tariffs on $34 billion in Chinese imports. And China will promptly strike back with tariffs on an equal amount of U.S. exports. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
July 03, 2018 - 8:13 am
BEIJING (AP) — China said Tuesday it's "fully prepared" for a trade war with the United States as hopes dwindle for a breakthrough in tensions this week between the world's two biggest economies. Washington is due to start charging tariffs on $34 billion in Chinese imports as of Friday while...
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FILE - In this file photo taken on Monday, July 18, 2016, butchers prepare cuts of meat at Smithfield Market, in London. A shortage of carbon dioxide in Europe is hitting food processing companies who rely on the gas to stun animals before slaughter, as it is announced Tuesday June 26, 2018, that some meat processing plants will run out of CO2 within days. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, FILE)
June 29, 2018 - 7:29 am
LONDON (AP) — A shortage of carbon dioxide in Europe could mean emptier supermarket shelves in Britain this weekend. Ian Wright, CEO of the Food and Drink Federation, told the BBC on Friday that the shortage of the gas, which is used in production and storage for many foods, could affect supplies...
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FILE - In this file photo taken on Monday, July 18, 2016, butchers prepare cuts of meat at Smithfield Market, in London. A shortage of carbon dioxide in Europe is hitting food processing companies who rely on the gas to stun animals before slaughter, as it is announced Tuesday June 26, 2018, that some meat processing plants will run out of CO2 within days. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, FILE)
June 26, 2018 - 8:44 am
LONDON (AP) — After beer, the summer barbecue may now be under threat in northern Europe. A shortage of carbon dioxide that has already drawn warnings from beer makers about potential production problems is also hitting food processing companies. Scotland's biggest pork producer said Tuesday it...
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In this Wednesday, June 20, 2018, photo, Catoctin Creek Distillery whiskey is on display in the tasting room in Purcellville, Va. The European Union on Friday will start taxing a range of U.S. imports, including Harley-Davidson bikes, cranberries, peanut butter, playing cards and whiskey. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
June 21, 2018 - 3:34 pm
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Much of the rye whiskey aging in hundreds of barrels at Catoctin Creek Distillery in Virginia could end up being consumed in Europe, a market the 9-year-old distilling company has cultivated at considerable cost. But an escalating trade dispute has the distillery's co-founder...
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June 13, 2018 - 10:33 am
ONONDAGA, N.Y. (AP) — Students from Japan and a researcher from New Zealand are among the scientists and hobbyists flocking to central New York for rare sightings of a big bug. The area's cicada (sih-KAY'-duh) brood emerges once every 17 years. The Post-Standard says the eastern U.S. is one of...
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FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 11, 2011 file photo, businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin, left, serves food to then-Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, center, during dinner at Prigozhin's restaurant outside Moscow, Russia. For many fans of food and football, a World Cup in Russia is unfamiliar territory. Russian cuisine has a reputation for being stodgy, unimaginative fare. While that may have been true for many in the days of Soviet supply shortages, a new generation of Russian in the World Cup’s host cities mix together influences from across Europe and Asia. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze, Pool, File)
June 07, 2018 - 10:29 am
MOSCOW (AP) — For many fans of food and football, a World Cup in Russia is unfamiliar territory. Russian cuisine has a reputation for being stodgy, unimaginative fare. While that may have been true for many in the days of Soviet supply shortages, a new generation of Russians in the World Cup's host...
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Nick D’Andrea, vice president of public affairs for UPS, hands the first shipments of bourbon whiskey to a UPS delivery driver in Louisville, Ky., Friday, June 1, 2018. Kentucky lawmakers passed a law that allows some tourists to distilleries to ship bottles of bourbon to their home. (AP Photo/Dylan Lovan)
June 01, 2018 - 1:28 pm
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Until recently, whiskey tourists in Kentucky had been able to sniff the aromas from bourbon-making and sip the finished product during distillery tours. But they weren't allowed to ship bottles home. That modern-day prohibition came to an end earlier this year, and was...
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FILE - In this Wednesday Nov. 13, 2013, file photo, Charlie Downs, the artisanal craft distiller at a new Heaven Hill Distilleries, Louisville, Ky., checks gauges on a still that will produce small batches of whiskey. The whiskey industry on Friday celebrated a new state law allowing some bourbon fans to receive home deliveries, shipped straight from their favorite Kentucky distilleries. Bourbon industry leaders and state officials led by Gov. Matt Bevin participated as the first shipments were sent off for delivery.(AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, File)
June 01, 2018 - 11:37 am
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Until now, whiskey tourists in Kentucky have been able to sniff the aromas from bourbon-making and sip the finished product during distillery tours. But they haven't been allowed to ship bottles home. That modern-day prohibition is coming to an end in the state, which...
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