Agriculture and the environment

In this June 5, 2013 photo, some of the hundreds of mustangs the U.S. Bureau of Land Management removed from federal rangeland peer at visitors at the BLM's Palomino Valley holding facility about 20 miles north of Reno in Palomino Valley, Nev. The U.S. Forest Service has built a corral in California that could allow it to bypass federal restrictions and lead to the slaughter of wild horses. The agency acknowledged in court filings in a potentially precedent-setting legal battle that it built the new pen for mustangs gathered in the fall on national forest land along the California-Nevada line because horses held at other federal facilities cannot be sold for slaughter. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner)
January 15, 2019 - 5:59 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service has built a new corral for wild horses in Northern California, which could allow it to bypass federal restrictions and sell the animals for slaughter. The agency acknowledged in court filings in a potentially precedent-setting legal battle that it built the...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018, file photo, acting EPA administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks in Lebanon, Tenn. Wheeler and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue met with farmers about a new Trump administration proposal to redefine "waters of the United States." Trump often points to farmers as among the biggest winners from the administration’s proposed rollback of federal protections for wetlands and waterways across the country. But under longstanding federal law and rules, farmers and farm land already are exempt from most of the regulatory hurdles on behalf of wetlands that the Trump administration is targeting. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
January 14, 2019 - 8:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump pointed to farmers Monday as winners from the administration's proposed rollback of federal protections for wetlands and waterways across the country, describing farmers crying in gratitude when he ordered the change. But under long-standing federal law and...
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In this photo taken March 25, 2018, wild boar are seen roaming near houses in Lomianki county on Warsaw outskirts.Tens of thousands of Poles are protesting a government plan to hold a massive slaughter of wild boars as a way to stop the spread of the deadly African swine fever among farm pigs. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
January 09, 2019 - 1:00 pm
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Tens of thousands of Poles are protesting a government plan to hold a massive slaughter of wild boars as a way to stop the spread of the deadly African swine fever among farm pigs. Poland's veterinary and farming officials approved the plan last year to kill 185,000 wild boars...
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FILE - This March 13, 2014 file photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a female wolf from the Minam pack outside La Grande, Ore., after it was fitted with a tracking collar. Environmental groups have withdrawn from talks aimed at updating the wolf management plan in Oregon. Wolf conservation advocates, ranchers and hunters have been meeting with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife for months to update the rules that protect and manage the state's rebounding wolf population. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, file)
January 07, 2019 - 6:07 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Environmental groups in Oregon announced Monday they have withdrawn from talks on how to manage the state's rebounding wolf population because of what they called a "broken" process, and concerns that state wildlife officials want to make it easier to kill wolves that eat...
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In this photo taken sometime between September and November 2018 and provided by Wolf Park, intern Alexandra Black trains with Khewa the wolf at Wolf Park in Battle Ground, Ind. The fatal mauling of Black, a zoo intern by a lion that escaped from a locked pen at the Conservators Center in North Carolina, illustrates the need for state regulators to crack down on unaccredited exhibitors of dangerous animals, animal welfare advocates said Monday, Dec. 31. (Monty Sloan/Wolf Park via AP)
December 31, 2018 - 8:42 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The fatal mauling of a zoo intern by a lion that escaped from a locked pen illustrates the need for North Carolina regulators to crack down on unaccredited exhibitors of dangerous animals, animal welfare advocates said Monday. Alexandra Black, 22, was attacked Sunday while...
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FILE - In this July 11, 2018, file photo, a field of corn grows in front of an old windmill in Pacific Junction, Iowa, The government shutdown could complicate things for farmers lining up for federal payments to ease the burden of President Donald Trump’s trade war with China. The USDA last week assured farmers that direct payments would keep going out during the first week of the shutdown. But payments will soon be suspended for farmers who haven’t certified production. Farm loans and disaster assistance programs will also be on hold. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File )
December 29, 2018 - 12:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The end of 2018 seemed to signal good things to come for America's farmers. Fresh off the passage of the farm bill, which reauthorized agriculture, conservation and safety net programs, the Agriculture Department last week announced a second round of direct payments to growers...
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President Donald Trump, followed by Vice President Mike Pence, arrives to speak at a signing ceremony for H.R. 2, the "Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018," in the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, on the White House complex, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
December 20, 2018 - 4:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has signed a massive $867 billion farm bill that reauthorizes agriculture and conservation programs without any cuts to the food stamp program. Trump signed the bill Thursday after the Agriculture Department announced plans to tighten work requirements for...
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Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler, seated left, signs an order withdrawing federal protections for countless waterways and wetlands, as Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works Rickey "RD" James, seated right, looks on, at EPA headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. Looking on behind are Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Ross, R-Kansas, left, and Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, second from right. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
December 11, 2018 - 5:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cabinet chiefs and GOP lawmakers celebrated alongside farm and business leaders Tuesday as the Trump administration made good on one of its biggest promised environmental rollbacks, proposing to lift federal protections for thousands of waterways and wetlands nationwide...
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A climate activists with a colorful mask attends the March for Climate in a protest against global warming in Katowice, Poland, Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, as the COP24 UN Climate Change Conference takes place in the city. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)
December 08, 2018 - 4:28 pm
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — Thousands of people from around the world marched Saturday through the southern Polish city that's hosting this year's U.N. climate talks, demanding that their governments take tougher action to curb global warming. Protesters included farmers from Latin America,...
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FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2018, photo, a malnourished boy sits on a hospital bed at the Aslam Health Center, Hajjah, Yemen. A UN report says feeding a hungry planet is growing increasingly difficult as climate change and depletion of land and other resources undermines food systems. A U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization report released Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018, said population growth requires supplies of more nutritious food at affordable prices. But raising farm output is hard given the fragility of the environment given that use of resources has outstripped Earth’s carrying capacity in terms of land, water, and climate change. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File)
November 28, 2018 - 8:39 pm
BANGKOK (AP) — Feeding a hungry planet is growing increasingly difficult as climate change and depletion of land and other resources undermine food systems, the U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization said Wednesday as it renewed appeals for better policies and technologies to reach "zero hunger."...
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