City Views: Son's struggle inspires Brooklyn mom to create braille clothing patch company

1010 WINS Newsroom
November 12, 2019 - 5:00 am
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NEW YORK (1010 WINS) -- Necessity is the mother of invention! Gracie Benedith-Cane, founder and CEO of Braille Code Inc., took that to heart when she saw her visually impaired son Wani struggle to get dressed.  She searched for products that would help but found there was nothing on the market.

Benedith-Cane told City Views host Sharon Barnes-Waters: “I remember one day he was sitting on the floor trying to put his pants on and his underwear, and I just kept watching him and I was like, 'How is he going to put on clothes, how is he going to do that?" So I started googling to see if I could find something, and I found nothing!”

Then one day she had an epiphany.

“I was sitting quietly in my house and I saw patches with my eyes open. I saw braille on them. It was the weirdest experience I had ever had—definitely a revelation. And then I just started making calls. I was like, 'I know what I’m supposed to do now; I’m supposed to make patches to put on clothes to dress blind and visually impaired people.'”

And so Braille Code Inc. was born. They make adhesive Braille patches for clothing and shoes to help blind and visually impaired people identify items by touch.

Gracie Benedith-Cane and her son Wani
1010 WINS

Benedith-Cane told Barnes-Waters she noticed that “blind children don’t have characters to look up to.” So she wrote a children’s book in 2018 called “What's Cool about Braille Code School.” The story takes a different and more positive spin on the “Three Blind Mice” nursery rhyme.  She thinks its characters will help build self-confidence and inspire blind children.

Printing the book in braille and making the patches has been a costly venture, and Benedith-Cane said she is looking for someone to see the importance of what she is doing and donate or even invest in her company.

Wani, the inspiration behind all that she does, told Barnes-Waters he is proud of his mom’s efforts to make it better for the blind community all over the world. “If this succeeds, and it definitely will, then they will be more independent and freer to be who they are.”

To learn more about the company and buy their patches and book, visit braillecodebrands.com.