Personnel from Chesed Shel Emes Emergency Services and Recovery Unit gather near the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018. Robert Bowers, the suspect in the mass shooting at the synagogue, expressed hatred of Jews during the rampage and told officers afterward that Jews were committing genocide and he wanted them all to die, according to charging documents made public Sunday. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

'In one day' safety of longtime Jewish enclave shattered

October 29, 2018 - 2:47 am

PITTSBURGH (AP) — For generations, Squirrel Hill has been known as one of Pittsburgh's most special enclaves and where the Tree of Life temple stood as a welcoming landmark.

Lifelong Squirrel Hill resident Jules Stein said, "People always felt safe here." Stein who until recently belonged to Tree of Life added, "In one day, that changed."

A gunman opened fire Saturday at the synagogue, killing 11 people. It was the type of violence that seemed impossible to many who called the neighborhood home.

It was the type of violence that seemed impossible to many who called the area home.

"The community is very resilient and we will rebound," former leader of Tree of Life, Rabbi Alvin Berkun, said. "But it will leave a scar forever."

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