FILE - In this May 29, 2019, file photo, special counsel Robert Mueller speaks at the Department of Justice in Washington, about the Russia investigation. To prepare for next week's high stakes hearing with Mueller, some Democratic members and staff are watching old video of his previous testimony. Others are closely re-reading Mueller's 448-page report. And most of them are worrying about how they'll make the most their short time in front of the stern, reticent former FBI director. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The Latest: Mueller testimony delayed until July 24

July 13, 2019 - 1:49 am

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on special counsel Robert Mueller's planned testimony before Congress (all times local):

8:10 p.m.

Special counsel Robert Mueller's testimony to Congress has been delayed until July 24 under an agreement that gives lawmakers more time to question him.

Mueller had been scheduled to testify July 17 about the findings of his Russia investigation. But lawmakers in both parties complained that the short length of the hearings would not allow enough time for all members to ask questions.

Under the new arrangement, Mueller will testify for an extended period of time with the House Judiciary and intelligence committees.

Mueller has expressed his reluctance to testify and said he won't go beyond what's in his report.

The Judiciary Committee is expected to focus on episodes in Mueller's report where Trump attempted to influence the investigation.

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11 a.m.

The timing of a highly-anticipated July 17 hearing with special counsel Robert Mueller was thrown into doubt Friday as Democrats negotiated a possible one-week delay with Mueller's representatives and the Justice Department.

The negotiations are ongoing, but an agreement under discussion would push the hearing to July 24 and give lawmakers more time for questioning. That's according to multiple people familiar with the talks who requested anonymity because a final decision had not been made.

Members of both parties have expressed worries that the hearing's scheduled format, which would give roughly two hours each to the judiciary and intelligence committees, doesn't provide enough time for all members to ask questions about Mueller's investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election.

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