FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. A long-delayed disaster aid bill that’s a top political priority for some of President Donald Trump’s GOP allies is facing a potentially tricky path as it heads to the Senate floor this week. Although the measure has wide backing from both parties, the White House isn’t pleased with the bill and is particularly opposed to efforts by Democrats to make hurricane relief to Puerto Rico more generous. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

The Latest: High court wary of limiting partisan map drawing

March 26, 2019 - 12:00 pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Supreme Court arguments over whether the political task of redistricting can be overtly partisan (all times local):

11:55 a.m.

The Supreme Court seems wary of getting federal judges involved in determining when electoral district maps are too partisan.

The high court on Tuesday was hearing more than two hours of arguments in two cases involving the issue. The first case involves North Carolina's heavily Republican congressional map, and the second involves a map drawn by Democrats in Maryland.

In deciding the two cases the high court could come out with the first limits on partisan politics in the drawing of electoral districts. It also could ultimately decide that federal judges have no role in trying to police political mapmaking.

Democrats and Republicans eagerly await the outcome of the cases because a new round of redistricting will follow the 2020 census. The decision could help shape the makeup of Congress and state legislatures over the next decade.

___

12:25 a.m.

The Supreme Court is returning to arguments over whether the political task of redistricting can be overly partisan.

The cases at the high court Tuesday mark the second time in consecutive terms the justices will see if they can set limits on drawing districts for partisan gain. Or the court could rule that federal judges should not referee disputes over districts designed to benefit one political party.

Democrats and Republicans eagerly await the outcome of cases from Maryland and North Carolina because a new round of redistricting will follow the 2020 census, and the decision could help shape the makeup of Congress and state legislatures over the next decade.

Last year, the court essentially punted on cases from Wisconsin and the same Maryland congressional district that's up for consideration Tuesday.

AP Editorial Categories: