'Game of Thrones,' 'Veep' aim for records at Emmy Awards

1010 WINS Newsroom
September 22, 2019 - 9:46 pm

Phoebe Waller-Bridge accepts the award for outstanding writing for a comedy series for "Fleabag" at the 71st Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019, at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — "Fleabag" leaped over formidable competition early in Sunday's Emmy Awards with three awards, including the best comedy actress award and a writing trophy for series star and creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge.

Waller-Bridge and her dark comedy about a dysfunctional woman, which also won a directing award, blocked "Veep" star Julia Louis-Dreyfus from setting a record as the most-honored performer in Emmy history.

"Nooooo!" said a shocked-looking Waller Bridge. "Oh, my God, no. Thank you. I find acting really hard and really painful. But it's all about this," she said, her acting trophy firmly in hand.

In accepting the writing award earlier, she called the recognition proof that "a dirty, pervy, messed-up woman can make it to the Emmys."

Bill Hader won his second consecutive best comedy actor award for the hitman comedy "Barry."

The auditorium erupted in cheers when Jharrel Jerome of "When They See Us," about the Central Park Five case, won the best actor award for a limited series movie.

"Most important, this is for the men that we know as the Exonerated Five," said Jerome, naming the five wrongly convicted men who were in the audience. They stood and saluted the actor as the crowd applauded them.

It was the only honor for the acclaimed Netflix series of the evening; "Chernobyl" won the best limited series honor.

Patricia Arquette won the trophy best supporting limited-series or movie actress for "The Act." She paid emotional tribute to her late trans sister, Alexis Arquette, and called for an end to prejudice against trans people, including in the workplace.

Ben Whishaw took the category's supporting actor trophy for "A Very English Scandal," admitting in charming British fashion to a hangover.

Alex Borstein and Tony Shalhoub of "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" won best supporting acting awards at the ceremony, which included early and varied messages of female empowerment after the hostless ceremony.

"I want to dedicate this to the strength of a woman, to (series creator) Amy Sherman-Palladino, to every woman on the 'Maisel' cast and crew," Borstein said, and to her mother and grandmother. Her grandmother survived because she was courageous enough to step out of a line that, Borstein intimated, would have led to her death at the hands of Nazi Germany.

"She stepped out of line. And for that, I am here and my children are here, so step out of line, ladies. Step out of line," said Borstein, who won the award last year.

Shalhoub added to his three Emmys which he earned for his signature role in "Monk." The awards opened without a host as promised, with an early exchange pitting Ben Stiller against Bob Newhart.

"I'm still alive," Newhart told Stiller, who introduced him as part of a wax museum comedy hall of fame that included Lucille Ball and George Burns.

Kim Kardashian West and Kendall Jenner drew some mocking laughter in the audience when they presented their award after Kardashian West said their family "knows firsthand how truly compelling television comes from real people just being themselves."

An animated Homer made a brief appearance on stage until he was abruptly crushed, with Anderson of "black-ish" rushing in to, as he vowed, rescue the evening. He called "Breaking Bad" star Cranston on stage to tout the power of television from its beginning to the current golden age.

"Television has never been bigger. Television has never mattered more. And television has never been this damn good," Cranston said.

The early honors for "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" and "Fleabag" came on a night that could belong to HBO's "Game of Thrones.

HBO's fantasy saga headed into the ceremony with a record 32 nominations, collecting 10 awards at last weekend's creative arts ceremony for technical and other achievements.

If the series adds three more wins on Sunday, it will break its own record for most awards in a season, 12, which it earned in 2015 and again in 2016. If it claims the top drama trophy, it will be its fourth and make it one of a handful of series to achieve that tally. It could also build on its record of the most Emmys ever for a drama or comedy series, now at 57.

The series is competing in six categories besides best drama, including directing, writing and acting — with stars Emilia Clarke and Kit Harington vying for lead acting honors for the first time, and Peter Dinklage seeking his fourth supporting actor award.

Clarke's competition includes Sandra Oh of "Killing Eve," who would be the first actress of Asian descent to win the Emmy, along with Oh's co-star Jodie Comer and past winner Viola Davis of "How to Get Away with Murder." A win for Clarke or any of the four "Game of Thrones" actresses competing for a supporting trophy would be the first for a woman on the show.

"The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel" is defending the top comedy award it captured last year, when three-time winner "Veep" was on hiatus. As with "Game of Thrones," the political satire is entered for its final season and could benefit from voter sentiment as well as evident respect.

The best drama actor field includes Billy Porter of "Pose," who would be the first openly gay man to win the award, and past winner Sterling K. Brown for "This Is Us."

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Online:

http://www.emmys.com .

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Associated Press Writer Beth Harris and AP Entertainment Writer Lindsey Bahr contributed to this report.

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Lynn Elber is at lelber@ap.org and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber