FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2018, file photo, the Rev. Jasper Williams, Jr., delivers the eulogy during the funeral service for Aretha Franklin at Greater Grace Temple, in Detroit. The controversial eulogy laid bare before the world what some black women say they have experienced for generations: sexism and inequality in their houses of worship every Sunday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

For black women at church, it's more than the Aretha eulogy

September 09, 2018 - 11:09 am

DETROIT (AP) — A black pastor's controversial eulogy at Aretha Franklin's funeral laid bare before the world what black women say they have experienced for generations: sexism and inequality in their houses of worship every Sunday.

The Rev. Jasper Williams Jr. told the audience that as "proud, beautiful and fine as our black women are, one thing a black woman cannot do — a black woman cannot raise a black boy to be a man."

The backlash was immediate, given Franklin's role as a mother and a pillar for women's rights.

For many black women, Williams' eulogy reopened wounds and sternly reminded them that black churches remain male-dominated institutions, where old-school resistance to women holding leadership roles is still alive.

AP Editorial Categories: