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A man walks by a closed store during the COVID-19 in Chicago, Thursday, April 30, 2020. Another 3.8 million people filed claims for jobless benefits last week, according to the Labor Department. While that's down from the previous week's 4.4 million, a staggering 30.3 million have applied for unemployment in the six weeks since the coronavirus began taking a wrecking ball to the U.S. job market. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 06, 2020 - 5:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The economic catastrophe caused by the viral outbreak likely sent the U.S. unemployment rate in April to its highest level since the Great Depression and caused a record-shattering loss of jobs. With the economy paralyzed by business closures, the unemployment rate likely jumped...
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In this image provided by Public Health Emergency, a department of Health and Human Services, Rick Bright is shown in his official photo from April 27, 2017, in Washington. Bright filed a complaint May 5, 2020, with the Office of Special Counsel, a government agency responsible for whistleblower complaints. He’s the former director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority. Bright alleges he was removed from his job and reassigned to a lesser role because he resisted political pressure to allow widespread use of hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug favored by President Donald Trump. (Health and Human Services via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 05, 2020 - 7:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration failed to prepare for the onslaught of the coronavirus, then sought a quick fix by trying to rush an unproven drug to patients, a senior government scientist alleged in a whistleblower complaint Tuesday. Dr. Rick Bright, former director of the Biomedical...
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McCormick Cafe manager Charli Perry, left, looks over an order with server Jane Goodridge as the restaurant reopened Monday, May 4, 2020 in Billings, Mont. The state is slowly opening up its economy as some other states extend shutdowns prompted by the coronavirus. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 05, 2020 - 11:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. service sector shrank for the first time in a decade last month as the pandemic forced shutdowns and layoffs nationwide. The Institute for Supply Management said Tuesday that its service-sector index fell to 41.8 in April, compared with a March reading of 52.5. Any...
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FILE - In this 1918 file photo made available by the Library of Congress, volunteer nurses from the American Red Cross tend to influenza patients in the Oakland Municipal Auditorium, used as a temporary hospital. Science has ticked off some major accomplishments over the last century. The world learned about viruses, cured various diseases, made effective vaccines, developed instant communications and created elaborate public-health networks. Yet in many ways, 2020 is looking like 1918, the year the great influenza pandemic raged. (Edward A. "Doc" Rogers/Library of Congress via AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 05, 2020 - 6:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite a century's progress in science, 2020 is looking a lot like 1918. In the years between two lethal pandemics, one the misnamed Spanish flu, the other COVID-19, the world learned about viruses, cured various diseases, made effective vaccines, developed instant communications...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a Fox News virtual town hall from the Lincoln Memorial, Sunday, May 3, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 05, 2020 - 6:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is making ever louder pronouncements casting blame on China for the COVID-19 pandemic, aiming to sidestep domestic criticism of the president's own response, tarnish China’s global reputation and give the U.S. leverage on trade and other aspects of U.S.-...
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This Sept. 18, 2019 photo shows the U.S. Treasury Department building viewed from the Washington Monument in Washington. The Treasury Department says it will need to borrow a record $2.99 trillion during the current April-June quarter to cover the cost of various rescue efforts dealing with the coronavirus pandemic. Treasury said Monday, May 4, 2020 that the $2.99 trillion it plans to borrow this quarter will far surpass the $530 billion quarterly borrowing it did in the July-September 2008 quarter as it dealt with the 2008 financial crisis. The extraordinary sum of $2.99 trillion of borrowing in a single quarter dwarfs the $1.28 trillion the government borrowed in the bond market for all of 2019. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 04, 2020 - 5:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The economic paralysis triggered by the coronavirus pandemic is forcing the U.S. Treasury to borrow far more than it ever has before — $2.99 trillion in the current quarter alone. The amount is more than five times the government’s previous record borrowing for a quarter, $569...
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Allison, 5, eats a lunch of refried beans, scrambled egg, and a handmade tortilla, at home, Wednesday, April 15, 2020, in Washington. It is the one meal a day that her mother can cook for their family, outside of cereal from a food bank that is quickly running out. With both of her parents out of work due to the coronavirus pandemic they will look each day for donated food to share. Most days it is a question of whether to pay for food or bills with the dwindling funds they have remaining. Job loss, ineligibility for federal programs, language barriers, unfamiliarity with the charity network, and a lack of access to technology can keep some immigrants from accessing available food aid. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 04, 2020 - 2:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — When all this started — when the coronavirus began stalking humanity like an animal hunting prey, when she and her husband lost their restaurant jobs overnight as the world shut down to hide, when she feared not being able to feed her family — Janeth went outside with a red...
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FILE - In this April 14, 2020 file photo, a woman holds her hand out to have blood collected for COVID-19 antibodies at a drive-thru site in Hempstead, N.Y. U.S. regulators on Monday, May 4 pulled back a decision that allowed scores of coronavirus blood tests to hit the market without first providing proof that they worked. The Food and Drug Administration said it took the action because some sellers have made false claims about the tests and their accuracy. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 04, 2020 - 11:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators Monday pulled back a decision that allowed scores of coronavirus blood tests to hit the market without first providing proof that they worked. The Food and Drug Administration said it took the action because some sellers have made false claims about the tests and...
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FILE - In this April 29, 2020, file photo Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at a news conference at the State Department in Washington. Chinese leaders “intentionally concealed the severity” of the pandemic from the world in early January, according to a 4-page, Department of Homeland Security report dated May 1 and obtained by The Associated Press. The revelation comes as the Trump administration has intensified its criticism of China, with Pompeo saying Sunday, May 3, that China has been responsible for the spread of disease in the past and must be held accountable for the outbreak of the current pandemic. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 04, 2020 - 10:17 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials believe China covered up the extent of the coronavirus outbreak — and how contagious the disease is — to stock up on medical supplies needed to respond to it, intelligence documents show. Chinese leaders “intentionally concealed the severity” of the pandemic from...
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In this screen grab from video issued by Britain's Oxford University, a volunteer is injected with either an experimental COVID-19 vaccine or a comparison shot as part of the first human trials in the U.K. to test a potential vaccine, led by Oxford University in England on April 25, 2020. About 100 research groups around the world are pursuing vaccines against the coronavirus, with nearly a dozen in early stages of human trials or poised to start. (University of Oxford via AP)
1010 WINS Newsroom
May 04, 2020 - 1:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of people are rolling up their sleeves in countries across the world to be injected with experimental vaccines that might stop COVID-19, spurring hope — maybe unrealistic — that an end to the pandemic may arrive sooner than anticipated. About 100 research groups are...
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