Small business

FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, members of the Culinary Workers Union, Local 226, assemble for a presentation at a university arena before an evening vote on whether to authorize a strike in Las Vegas. The two largest resort operators in Las Vegas would lose more than $10 million a day combined if housekeepers, cooks and others go on strike, a possibility starting Friday, the union representing thousands of casino workers said, Thursday, May 31, 2018. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP, File)
May 31, 2018 - 6:58 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — The possibility of 50,000 Las Vegas casino workers going on strike drew closer Thursday, with their contracts expiring at midnight and the prospects of new ones still uncertain. The bartenders, housekeepers, bellmen and other unionized workers at 34 casino-hotels on the Strip and...
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McGregor Scott, right, the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of California, accompanied by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, discusses an increase in the use of a banned pesticide at illegal marijuana farms hidden on public lands Tuesday, May 29, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. Researchers found the highly toxic pesticide Carbofuran, which can't legally be used in the Unites States, at 72 percent of grow sites last year, up 15 percent from 2012. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
May 29, 2018 - 6:57 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — An alarming increase in the use of a highly toxic and banned pesticide at illegal marijuana farms hidden on public land in California is leading U.S. and state officials to team up on an issue that recently divided them: pot. They announced Tuesday that they will use $2.5...
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FILE – In this April 15, 2018, file photo, demonstrators protest outside the Starbucks cafe in Philadelphia where two black men were arrested three days earlier for waiting inside without ordering anything. On Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the company plans to close more than 8,000 stores nationwide to conduct anti-bias training, a move intended to show how serious the company is about living up to its now tarnished image as a neighborhood hangout where all are welcome. (AP Photo/Ron Todt, File)
May 28, 2018 - 5:25 pm
Starbucks, trying to put to rest an outcry over the arrest of two black men at one of its stores, is closing more than 8,000 stores for an afternoon of anti-bias training, a strategy some believe can keep racism at bay. After the arrests in Philadelphia last month, the coffee chain's leaders...
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In this May 17, 2018 photo, Miriam Zouzounis looks through a selection of tobacco products while interviewed at Ted's Market, her family's store, in San Francisco. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. is pumping millions of dollars into a campaign to persuade San Francisco voters to reject a ban on selling flavored tobacco products, including menthol cigarettes and vaping liquids with flavors like cotton candy, mango and cool cucumber. Zouzounis, a board member of the Arab American Grocers Association, which represents 400 small-business owners in the San Francisco Bay Area, said the ban would remove an anchor product that attracts customers, many of which are immigrant-owned. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
May 28, 2018 - 2:57 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A major tobacco company is pumping millions of dollars into a campaign to persuade San Francisco voters to reject a ban on selling flavored tobacco products, including menthol cigarettes, certain chewing tobaccos and vaping liquids with flavors like cotton candy, mango and cool...
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This May 29, 2016 photo provided by Christian Kahahawai shows Lyndsey Haraguchi-Nakayama planting huli, or taro seedlings at her farm in Hanalei, Kauai island, Hawaii. Farmers on the Hawaiian island of Kauai say their state should brace for a shortage of its taro crop, a staple of the traditional Hawaiian diet, after record-breaking rains flooded their fields in April 2018. Haraguchi-Nakayama said damage from the flooding was the worst her family has seen, including her 96-year-old grandfather. It did more harm to their 55-acre farm than Hurricane Iniki that slammed Kauai in 1992. (Christian Kahahawai/Kahahawai Photography via AP)
May 28, 2018 - 12:10 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Farmers on the Hawaiian island of Kauai say their state should brace for a shortage of its taro crop, a staple of the traditional Hawaiian diet, after record-breaking rains flooded their fields. The deluge hit the north shore community of Hanalei particularly hard. The region grows...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017 file photo, Elvis tribute artist Eddie Powers poses for a photo with newlyweds Rob and Kelly Roznowski after he married them at the Welcome to Las Vegas sign in Las Vegas. What happens in Vegas could have a ripple effect across the country if casino hotel workers go on strike next week. If members of the union that includes hotel and food workers don't show up to work, it could cost the city millions and lead to vacation woes for anyone making the trip to Sin City. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)
May 23, 2018 - 9:10 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Ripple effects are likely to be felt if 50,000 workers employed at more than 30 world-famous casino-hotels in Las Vegas go on strike. Analysts declined Wednesday to weigh in on the financial impact that a strike could have on casino operators. But the casinos and hotels aren't the...
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Volunteer Jenifer Murias yells into a megaphone as Culinary Union members file into a university arena to vote on whether to authorize a strike Tuesday, May 22, 2018, in Las Vegas. A potential strike would affect 34 casino-hotels. A majority yes vote would not immediately affect the casinos, but it would give union negotiators a huge bargaining chip by allowing them to call for a strike at any time starting June 1. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken)
May 23, 2018 - 1:38 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Las Vegas casinos could watch tens of thousands of employees walk off the job for the first time in more than three decades after union members voted Tuesday to authorize a strike at any time starting June 1, a move that could cripple the city's world-famous resorts. About 25,000...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle. While the Seattle Police Department bars officers from using real-time facial recognition in body camera video, privacy activists are concerned that a proliferation of the technology could turn the cameras into tools of mass surveillance. The ACLU and other organizations on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, asked Amazon to stop selling its facial-recognition tool, called Rekognition, to law enforcement agencies. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 22, 2018 - 6:04 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon's decision to market a powerful face recognition tool to police is alarming privacy advocates, who say the tech giant's reach could vastly accelerate a dystopian future in which camera-equipped officers can identify and track people in real time, whether they're involved in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 1, 2015, file photo, an elephant crosses a road at a national park in Hwange, Zimbabwe. Federal prosecutors in Colorado have indicted the owner of a South African hunting company, accusing the man of breaking U.S. law on hunting elephants and importing ivory. Hanno van Rensburg has not been arrested yet. He did not respond Monday, May 21, 2018, to an email sent to an address listed on his hunting company's website. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi, File)
May 22, 2018 - 4:59 pm
DENVER (AP) — U.S. prosecutors have indicted the owner of a South African hunting company, accusing him of bribing Zimbabwean officials while guiding a Colorado tourist and working to have the ivory tusks of an elephant that the group illegally killed inside a national park imported to the United...
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In this May 11, 2018, photo, Danielle Schumacher, CEO and co-founder of THC Staffing Group, a recruitment firm that encourages a more diverse cannabis industry workforce, smells some cannabis flowers at Berkeley Patients Group in Berkeley, Calif. Women have made inroads in the male-dominated cannabis business. But they still face a so-called grass ceiling as the industry grows and becomes more mainstream. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
May 22, 2018 - 2:50 pm
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — When Danielle Schumacher attended her first convention of marijuana activists about 15 years ago, she could count on one hand all the women in a room of older men. The lack of diversity struck the then-college student, who remembers feeling out of place but also determined to...
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