Lifestyle

In this photo taken March 24, 2020, Mia Grace, right, holds a package of toilet paper as she and her dog Breezy observe social distancing chalk marks on the sidewalk while waiting to get in to The Reef Capitol Hill, a marijuana store in Seattle, which was limiting the number of people in the store at one time to help slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Earlier in the week, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee ordered nonessential businesses to close and the state's more than 7 million residents to stay home in order to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. In Washington and several other states where marijuana is legal, pot shops and workers in the market's supply chain were deemed essential and allowed to remain open. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 28, 2020 - 4:30 pm
The coronavirus pandemic is defining for the globe what's “essential” and what things we really can't do without, even though we might not need them for survival. Attempting to slow the spread of the virus, authorities in many places are determining what shops and services can remain open. They're...
Read More
In this photo taken March 24, 2020, Mia Grace, right, holds a package of toilet paper as she and her dog Breezy observe social distancing chalk marks on the sidewalk while waiting to get in to The Reef Capitol Hill, a marijuana store in Seattle, which was limiting the number of people in the store at one time to help slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Earlier in the week, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee ordered nonessential businesses to close and the state's more than 7 million residents to stay home in order to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. In Washington and several other states where marijuana is legal, pot shops and workers in the market's supply chain were deemed essential and allowed to remain open. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 28, 2020 - 4:30 pm
The coronavirus pandemic is defining for the globe what's “essential” and what things we really can't do without, even though we might not need them for survival. Attempting to slow the spread of the virus, authorities in many places are determining what shops and services can remain open. They're...
Read More
Stephanie Owens looks over the garden with her son, Cole, as they tend to it at their home Wednesday March 25 , 2020, in Glen Allen, Va. Owens is a pharmacist who has had to continue to go to work, but has been able to spend more time with her kids because they are home from school . One of the activities that they have done is planting the garden. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 28, 2020 - 6:30 am
GLEN ALLEN, Va. (AP) — In a quiet suburb just north of Richmond, Virginia, a mother and her three children spend a weekday afternoon planting a small garden of spinach, red cabbage and lettuce. Across town, a dad teaches his kids how to play volleyball on an empty court. In a sprawling park, a...
Read More
Stephanie Owens looks over the garden with her son, Cole, as they tend to it at their home Wednesday March 25 , 2020, in Glen Allen, Va. Owens is a pharmacist who has had to continue to go to work, but has been able to spend more time with her kids because they are home from school . One of the activities that they have done is planting the garden. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 28, 2020 - 6:30 am
GLEN ALLEN, Va. (AP) — In a quiet suburb just north of Richmond, Virginia, a mother and her three children spend a weekday afternoon planting a small garden of spinach, red cabbage and lettuce. Across town, a dad teaches his kids how to play volleyball on an empty court. In a sprawling park, a...
Read More
FILE - This Sept. 12, 2019 file photo shows Hoda Kotb at the Save the Children's "The Centennial Gala: Changing the World for Children" in New York. Kotb's emotions got the better of her on the “Today" show Friday as she concluded a segment with New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, who is donating money to help with the outbreak of coronavirus there. “Drew, we love ya,” Kotb said. Then she dissolved in tears, and co-anchor Savannah Guthrie jumped in to take over. Kotb was a news anchor and reporter at the CBS affiliate in New Orleans during the 1990s. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 27, 2020 - 5:30 pm
From finding ways to help others cope to sheltering in place to canceling events, here’s a look at some of the ways the entertainment industry is reacting to the spread of the coronavirus, which most people recover from but can cause severe illness in the elderly and those with preexisting medical...
Read More
FILE - This Sept. 12, 2019 file photo shows Hoda Kotb at the Save the Children's "The Centennial Gala: Changing the World for Children" in New York. Kotb's emotions got the better of her on the “Today" show Friday as she concluded a segment with New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, who is donating money to help with the outbreak of coronavirus there. “Drew, we love ya,” Kotb said. Then she dissolved in tears, and co-anchor Savannah Guthrie jumped in to take over. Kotb was a news anchor and reporter at the CBS affiliate in New Orleans during the 1990s. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 27, 2020 - 5:30 pm
From finding ways to help others cope to sheltering in place to canceling events, here’s a look at some of the ways the entertainment industry is reacting to the spread of the coronavirus, which most people recover from but can cause severe illness in the elderly and those with preexisting medical...
Read More
In this Monday, March 23, 2020, photo, Karen Haley cuts cotton fabric for masks to be given to caregivers during the coronavirus outbreak, at the North Sails shop in Freeport, Maine. The sail-maintenance business has converted part of its operation towards stitching masks instead of sails. Owner Eric Baldwin stitches masks in background. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 27, 2020 - 4:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — On the coast of Maine, Eric Baldwin and his staff of two usually spend their days selling, repairing and washing sails for boats. They transform their surplus sailcloth into tote bags to bring in extra money. But when the coronavirus outbreak slowed business, they turned their...
Read More
In this Monday, March 23, 2020, photo, Karen Haley cuts cotton fabric for masks to be given to caregivers during the coronavirus outbreak, at the North Sails shop in Freeport, Maine. The sail-maintenance business has converted part of its operation towards stitching masks instead of sails. Owner Eric Baldwin stitches masks in background. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 27, 2020 - 4:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — On the coast of Maine, Eric Baldwin and his staff of two usually spend their days selling, repairing and washing sails for boats. They transform their surplus sailcloth into tote bags to bring in extra money. But when the coronavirus outbreak slowed business, they turned their...
Read More
Mark Andersen, 60, co-director of the nonprofit organization, "We Are Family DC," organizes groceries and food to be brought to seniors, Saturday, March 21, 2020, in Washington. Seniors are being encouraged to stay in their homes due to the risk of the COVID-19 coronavirus. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 27, 2020 - 2:54 pm
One remembers the polio epidemic and the hardships of World War II. One is stoic about it all — because, he says, he's already “here past the welcome.” A third, old enough to remember the aftermath of the 1918 flu epidemic, turns to her faith in challenging times. For older Americans, some of the...
Read More
This combination photo shows actors, from left, Laurence Fishburne, Matt Damon and Kate Winslet, who are among the stars of the 2011 thriller “Contagion” who have reunited for a series of public service announcements to warn about COVID-19. They have teamed up with scientists from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health to offer four individual homemade videos. (AP Photo)
1010 WINS Newsroom
March 27, 2020 - 2:24 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The stars of the 2011 virus thriller “Contagion” — a prescient film these days — have reunited for a series of public service announcements to warn about COVID-19. Matt Damon, Laurence Fishburne, Kate Winslet and Jennifer Ehle have teamed up with scientists from Columbia University'...
Read More

Pages